Hot Soba Noodles in Broth (Kake-Soba)

The other soba option is hot soba noodles served in a hot, flavorful broth. Classically speaking, you don’t want too much broth—because an old Japanese tradition holds that the diner who eats too much broth with his soba doesn’t appreciate the noodles themselves, and is probably an unsophisticate from the sticks. Don’t be afraid to slurp those noodles, however, which even the city slickers do—because slurping enables you to cool them as you eat them, which means you can eat them while they’re still hot, which means they won’t get soft in the broth as they sit waiting for you to deem them cool enough.

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Rosengarten Report Exclusive: Veal, Bacon and Sausage Stew On Truffled Polenta

You will be caught off guard by the cosmic click of this cold-weather combo!

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Rosengarten On Forbes: Whither Fusion?

Without doubt, many grown-up chefs would prefer the name of this article to be “Wither, Fusion!”…as in a culinary command! Chefs with experience don’t like the term “fusion,” never have. In a recent rant on Nation’s Restaurant News, Brett Thorn…one of our most perceptive overseers of food trends…offered a short history of “fusion,” and the emotions it elicits…

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Wine For The Weekend

2009 Ad Agio, Montecucco Sangiovese Reserva, Basile, Italy ($42)

It is the natural order of things: a wine from a certain wine region gets hot, its star rises on the international market…and its prices rise too. Sometimes prohibitively! Then, miracle of miracles, just as loyal purchasers of the first wine are getting priced out…a new wine is discovered nearby, with a regional name no one has heard of! And, at least in the initial stages of marketing…the “new” wine has a gentle price! And lots of new fans, among those lucky enough to know it!

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New England Boiled Dinner

The New England Boiled Dinner probably is not descended from such glamorous European variations of the boiled, one-pot main course as the French pot-au-feu or the Italian bollito misto or the Spanish cocido; those versions usually use a variety of meats in the one pot. The New England dish is probably a descendant of an Old England dish, where one meat in the pot is much more common. The one meat originally used in this Yankee dish (which was first named in print in the 1890s) was salt beef; today, corned beef (quite similar) is the meat of choice.

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