Rosengarten on HuffPo: Making the Perfect Lobster Roll

There’s not much complexity in making a lobster roll. The most complex part is the opening question: which lobster roll do you want to make? For there are actually two main varieties: the cold, mayonnaise-y one, and the hot, buttered one!

Read full story

WINE MONDAY: David’s Wine of the Week

I love Puglia, especially love the food of Puglia…but have tried for so many years to love the wine of Puglia on a consistent basis. The typical profile, for me, has been dark, extra-ripe wine, brimming with Port-like flavors, not to mention an alcohol content that itself almost mirrors port. The world is buzzing, these days, with the concept of lower-alcohol, more graceful wine: can it be the Pugliese are listening?

Read full story

Big Fat Yeast Rolls With Honey Butter

These are wonderful, soft rolls without a name—so I’ve called them exactly what they are. You will find them all over the South, particularly at buffet restaurants where they’re placed on your table. This is done, presumably, to fill you up—but I sure don’t mind getting filled up with these puffy clouds. They are traditionally served with an individual crock of honey butter for each diner, so that each diner may dip his or her own puffy roll in fluffy sweet butter.

Read full story

The Return of the Rosengarten Report

I’m having the time of my life right now working furiously on the first issue of the soon-to-be-resurrected ROSENGARTEN REPORT, due imminently…in fact, on Dec. 15, 2014! As you may know, the old ROSENGARTEN REPORT had a six-year run, from 2001 on—attracting 50,000 paid subscribers, and a James Beard Award for best food-and-wine newsletter in America. The REPORT was the shining achievement of my entire 30-year career in food-and-wine journalism. Unfortunately, it was slowed, then finally stopped, by that ol’ devil zeitgeist of 2008, death to earnest entrepreneurs everywhere.

Read full story

Oven-Dried Tomatoes + Eggplant Timbales with Pesto

You’ll be amazed at the flavor and concentration of these tomatoes, which are simply baked in the oven at a very low temperature for many hours. Use them immediately in tomato salads, in sauces, in stews. Or, mix them with herbs and garlic, cover them with good olive oil, and hold them for a few days in a container at room temperature.

Read full story